Making Caring Common
Raising kids who care about others and the common good.
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Resources for Families

Welcome to Making Caring Common’s Resources for Families, Parents, and Caregivers!

We offer tips, resources lists, discussion guides, and more, which we hope you will use with your kids. You can review the list of resources below or click to sort by the following topics: Bias, College Admissions, Gender, Raising Caring Kids, Romantic Relationships, Sexual Harassment and Misogyny, Working with Schools

 

Welcome to Making Caring Common’s Resources for Families, Parents, and Caregivers!

We offer tips, resources lists, discussion guides, and more, which we hope you will use with your kids. Our work includes key topics, all connected by our commitment to forefront caring and concern for the common good at school, at home, and in our communities. You can review the list of resources below or use the dropdown to sort by topic.

 

 

For Families: Sexual Harassment and Misogyny Resource List

The following is a partial list of resources for parents interested in preventing misogyny and sexual harassment.

These resources offer useful activities, information, websites, programs, and curricula. While we think each of the identified resources contains valuable information, we do not endorse all the recommendations or views in these resources. Some of the resource descriptions listed below have been pulled from organizational websites.

 
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Overview
For: Parents and Caregivers
Ages: Middle School and High School
Resource Type: Resource List


Programs and Resources that Support Girls and Women

  • 7 Tips for Talking to Kids about Porn is Common Sense Media’s guide for talking with kids about pornography and what they might see on the internet.

  • 10 Tips on Talking About Healthy Relationships with Teens, developed by Futures Without Violence, provides parents with tips on how to talk with their teens about healthy relationships.

  • Break the Cycle: Dating Abuse includes facts, infographics, and handouts for talking about healthy/unhealthy teen relationships, relationship realities for teens, and how to foster LBGTQ inclusivity.

  • Breaking Up Is Hard to Do: 10 Tips for Supporting Your Teen provides a list of actions, developed by the Boston Public Health Commission, which adults can take to support teens during break-ups.

  • How to Talk to Your Children about Consent and Sexual Assault offers suggestions for how parents can talk with their children about consent and sexual assault.

  • How to Talk to Your Kids about Sexual Assault includes statistics, questions to ask children, and tips for parents to use when talking with teens about sexual assault.

  • Fight the New Drug is a website about the effects of pornography, featuring guidelines for parents, and recovery programs for porn users.

  • The IPV Prevention Council seeks to enhance the capacity of local domestic violence coalitions and programs. Their website includes many prevention resources and a prevention “tools inventory.”

  • “Ending Sexual Harassment,” a chapter within the Title IX report, defines sexual harassment, provides statistics about the prevalence of sexual harassment in K-12 schools and among LBGTQ students, highlights the effects of sexual harassment on students, and discusses protections available.

Resources Specifically for Young People

  • Amaze has videos and information for young people about sex, their bodies, and relationships. The website also features discussion questions and conversation starters for parents and educators.

  • Break the Cycle motivates and supports young people to speak out about dating abuse in their schools and communities. Features information about healthy relationships, consent, setting boundaries, using online dating apps, etc…

  • Confi provides a compilation of information on sensitive health topics, research, and facts. Young people can learn about healthy relationships, how to communicate about sex, consent, setting boundaries, etc…

  • The Halls tells the stories of three young men and their struggles sifting through relationships, trauma, masculinity, and their own identities.

  • I am Courageous encourages and teaches students how to use their voices to help end teen dating abuse through information sheets, tips, resource lists, and videos.

  • Juicebox is an app for teens to ask questions about sex and relationships, featuring advice from coaches.

  • Love Is Respect provides support, information, and resources for young people who have questions or concerns about abuse in dating relationships. The website includes a variety of quizzes and visual graphics about dating violence, healthy relationships, and consent and features abuse resources especially for LGBTQ students. Free and confidential phone, live chat, and texting services are also available.

  • Scarleteen includes “real world” information about sexuality and relationships for teens and emerging adults and provides guidance and strategies for young people around sexual health and sexuality, consent, healthy relationships, escaping abuse, and sexual communication.

  • Start Strong Boston, a program of the Boston Public Health Commission, supports young people to end teen dating violence and to learn skills and strategies for healthy relationships. The website includes relationship communication strategies, a healthy relationship quiz, tools for thinking through break-ups, and activities to think through the misogynistic content of popular music lyrics.

  • Start with Respect includes tips and guidance for teen men about how to build and have respectful relationships/sexual relationships with women.

  • The Representation Project features resources such as quizzes that ask teens to assess how well fictional characters defy stereotypes and/ or act as positive role models, and conversation starters/activities for youth leaders and female athletes about the ways in which mainstream media shapes their beliefs about women and girls.

  • Youth Activist Prevention Toolkit, a project of the Florida Commission Against Domestic Violence’s Youth Advisory Board, is for students who wish to raise awareness about teen dating violence and prevent its occurrence in their schools and communities.

  • Fight the New Drug is a website about the effects of pornography, featuring guidelines for parents, and recovery programs for porn users.

  • The IPV Prevention Council seeks to enhance the capacity of local domestic violence coalitions and programs. Their website includes many prevention resources and a prevention “tools inventory.”

  • “Ending Sexual Harassment,” a chapter within the Title IX report, defines sexual harassment, provides statistics about the prevalence of sexual harassment in K-12 schools and among LBGTQ students, highlights the effects of sexual harassment on students, and discusses protections available.

Last reviewed October 2018.


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