Making Caring Common
Raising kids who care about others and the common good.
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Read the latest from Making Caring Common! You’re in the right place for our media coverage, general updates, and press releases. Topics include: Access and Equity, Bias, Bullying, Caring and Empathy, College Admissions, Gender, MCC Update, Misogyny and Sexual Harassment, Moral and Ethical Development, Parenting, Romantic Relationships, School Culture, Trauma, and Youth Advisory Board.

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Read the latest from Making Caring Common! You’re in the right place for our media coverage, general updates, and press releases. Our work spans a range of topics, all connected by our commitment to forefront caring and concern for the common good at school, at home, and in our communities. You can review what’s new below or use the dropdown to sort by topic.

Join our email list and connect with us on Facebook and Twitter to stay current with Making Caring Common’s news and updates. If you’re a member of the media, please visit our Media Room.

 

 
Posts in Topic Bias Bullying
In the News: Want to Reduce Bullying in School? Bring in the Babies

Richard Weissbourd and Jennifer Kahn found that in schools where students reported having more empathy, students also reported fewer experiences of bullying and were more likely to try to stop bullying. Read more in this article in Nation Swell about how Roots of Empathy teaches children empathy — specifically by exposing them to babies.

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Bringing Kindness to School Lunch with Natalie Hampton

High school senior Natalie Hampton knows what it’s like to eat lunch alone. In junior high, she experienced bullying and harassment so severe that she eventually transferred to a different school. As she shared with Making Caring Common, “More than any of the physical attacks or verbal bullying, [eating lunch alone] demonstrated to me how ostracized I was from my school community, and it grew to be more hopeless as more and more people walked past my table without stopping.”

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