Making Caring Common
Raising kids who care about others and the common good.
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Resources for Families

Welcome to Making Caring Common’s Resources for Families, Parents, and Caregivers!

We offer tips, resources lists, discussion guides, and more, which we hope you will use with your kids. You can review the list of resources below or click to sort by the following topics: Bias, College Admissions, Gender, Raising Caring Kids, Romantic Relationships, Sexual Harassment and Misogyny, Working with Schools

 

Welcome to Making Caring Common’s Resources for Families, Parents, and Caregivers!

We offer tips, resources lists, discussion guides, and more, which we hope you will use with your kids. Our work includes key topics, all connected by our commitment to forefront caring and concern for the common good at school, at home, and in our communities. You can review the list of resources below or use the dropdown to sort by topic.

 

 

For Families: The Parents We Mean To Be (Book)

Richard Weissbourd’s book The Parents We Mean To Be: How Well-Intentioned Adults Undermine Children's Moral and Emotional Development is a wake-up call for a national crisis in parenting—and a deeply helpful book for those who want to see their own behaviors as parents with the greatest possible clarity.

 
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Overview
For: Parents and Caregivers
Ages: K-12
Resource Type: Book


Weissbourd argues incisively that parents—not peers, not television—are the primary shapers of their children’s moral lives. And yet, it is parents’ lack of self-awareness and confused priorities that are dangerously undermining children’s development.

Through the author’s own original field research, including hundreds of rich, revealing conversations with children, parents, teachers, and coaches, a surprising picture emerges.

Parents’ intense focus on their children’s happiness is turning many children into self-involved, fragile conformists. The suddenly widespread desire of parents to be closer to their children—a heartening trend in many ways—often undercuts kids’ morality. Our fixation with being great parents—and our need for our children to reflect that greatness—can actually make them feel ashamed for failing to measure up. Finally, parents’ interactions with coaches and teachers—and coaches’ and teachers’ interactions with children—are critical arenas for nurturing, or eroding, children’s moral lives.

Weissbourd’s ultimately compassionate message—based on compelling new research—is that the intense, crisis-filled, and profoundly joyous process of raising a child can be a powerful force for our own moral development.

Last reviewed October 2018.