Making Caring Common
Raising kids who care about others and the common good.
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Resources for Families

Welcome to Making Caring Common’s Resources for Families, Parents, and Caregivers!

We offer tips, resources lists, discussion guides, and more, which we hope you will use with your kids. You can review the list of resources below or click to sort by the following topics: Bias, College Admissions, Gender, Raising Caring Kids, Romantic Relationships, Sexual Harassment and Misogyny, Working with Schools

 

Welcome to Making Caring Common’s Resources for Families, Parents, and Caregivers!

We offer tips, resources lists, discussion guides, and more, which we hope you will use with your kids. Our work includes key topics, all connected by our commitment to forefront caring and concern for the common good at school, at home, and in our communities. You can review the list of resources below or use the dropdown to sort by topic.

 

 

For Families: Circles of Concern: Transgender Students Discussion Guide

One of the most effective ways to build empathy for people outside your immediate circles is to learn about and interact with people who are different from you in race, class, culture, and who hold different religious or political beliefs. At Making Caring Common, we call this expanding your "circle of concern."

This post is based on a story that caught our attention on Storycorps, and tells the story of Chris and Gabe López in Tucson, Arizona. Gabe, a transgender boy, recounts the story of coming out to his mother as transgender, his feeling of comfort in her acceptance, and the joy of finding new friends at summer camp. Listen to the audio story below, and access the full piece on the Storycorps website.

 
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Overview
For: Parents and Caregivers
Ages: K-12
Resource Type: Discussion Guide


Now that you've listened to the piece, here are some questions to consider, either on your own or with your children:

  1. What elements of this story did you identify with? The relationship between parent and child, perhaps, or telling a parent something difficult?

  2. What did you learn from this story? 

  3. How do you think it felt for Gabe and his mom to have this conversation? How might you have felt if you were Gabe or one of Gabe's parents?

  4. Was there anything about this story that was difficult for you or made you uncomfortable? What was it and why do you think you had that reaction?

  5. What would be valuable about sharing this story with your family or friends? What might be difficult about sharing it? 


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